Tuesday, March 24, 2009

Did you know this??..and today's loom activity




Did you know that every couple of years you need to do an important maintenance job on your Macomber Loom? I didn't know this until I had owned my loom for about ten years. The jacks on the loom are made of brass, and anywhere that the brass comes in contact with steel, you must apply a good coating of Vaseline.

From what I understand when the brass and the steel come into contact, the brass erodes. This means that on your loom's jacks, the little place where the steel rods insert into the brass jacks must get a dab of Vaseline. The Vaseline acts as a buffer between the two different metals. Here is a photo of me doing this job on my loom. I used a Q-tip to dab the goo in the spot.

Here's a photo of my studio and loom. Notice my lap top, I use it with Patternland software to drive the loom. I cut the piece off the loom and hung it up to review the work. At this point I will do much more to the piece with hand stitching and embellishments. But I thought you all might be interested to see my work in progress.

Happy Day! Sarah

17 comments:

  1. I love the tree and look forward to seeing what else you do with it!!

    I secretly want to know all the ins and outs of the air assist - or whatever it's called that helps you raise the shafts.

    I've promised myself I'll do loom maintenance at the end of my current warp. We'll see if I keep that promise!!

    Sue

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  2. Sue
    Ok, now I know my topic for my next post..the air assist system! I also plan on an interview with Eddie and Rick for their thoughts on loom maintenance.

    I wonder how many folks do a sort of loom cleaning after each big warp?? Any ideas out there?

    And I want to explore the topic of humidity and looms/weaving. Sarah

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  3. Thanks for the maintenance info., I have several Macomber looms and will do that before I warp them up again. I just ordered sectional beams for 2 of my looms. It was time to make warping a little easier. And by the way talking to the folks a Macomber has always been a really good experience. They are so helpful. Enjoy your day.

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  4. Looking forward to lots of Macomber info on this blog - well, and info on weaving in general since you do such beautiful and inspiring work.

    I put an award for you in my blog, so hopefully some of my blog friends will become your blog friends!

    Sue

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  5. Thanks for the info. I bought used older looms with very little maintenance done. Any other places need TLC? What parts may be worn out? I am a fiber artist and include weaving in my work (mostly art quilts). Love this blog!!!!!

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  6. Hi "Fiber"~ The basic maintenance of a Macomber includes a light cleaning after each warp is taken off. For me this means: light dusting, inspect parts for wear, a general "once-over". Parts that often need attention: apron strings or cloth, cables for brakes, friction drum wipe-down, beater rest adjustment(to keep it level). I think I will post some tid-bits on this topics soon! Stay tuned, and thanks for the encouragement!
    Sarah

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  7. Hi Sarah,
    How wonderful to find your site. Just a couple of days ago I posted to a weaving list concerning some health issues I'm having. Several suggested I look into the air lift. Have been a Macomber owner for 35 years and have never known about or seen an air lift. I have no idea what it does, how it attaches, how it is used or what the approximate cost might be. So looking forward to your writings on this subject! ....And, I never knew about the Vaseline maintenance tip. Thirty-five years!!....my poor Macomber has been neglected. As it's evening now, I'll do that tomorrow. Chris

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  8. Hello Treadles!

    Thanks for your note. I will post soon another detailed description of the air system. I LOVE mine and have used it for 12 years. No problems to speak of, perhaps general maintenance things like I have already discussed.

    So keep in touch, and I'll be back soon with some Air Dobby news!

    Sarah

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  9. holy cow... good to know! thanks!

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  10. I am looking for an instruction book for a 24 inch macomber loom. Can you help?

    Cornelia

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  11. Hi Cornelia:

    There is no instruction book, but there is a small pamphlet that comes with the loom when it is new. I have scanned it and posted it in an older blog.
    http://macomberloomsandme.blogspot.com/2009/07/little-tid-bits-and-more.html

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  12. I just can't sayenough about the wonderful people at MacOmber's! I'm new to weaving and my first loom is a Mac - as will be any future looms. Bob at the shop was very helpful and was even able to give me a bit of history on my loom. I've ordered parts from them too and the service is great! Thanks MacOmber for doing it right! kat

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  13. If you have a large B4 56" 16 harness loom and you're setting up to weave, what do you do with the extra harnesses and heddles that are in the way? It is not easy to slide the heddles to the sides due to the hooks on the harnesses. And it seems like a chore to take the harness out and take them apart to move heddles. We have been restoring this loom and are almost done and, of course, have never used it. Maybe it's better to simply not install harnesses that won't be used. Thanks Terry B.

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  14. Terry B:
    Yes those pesky little clips that divide the heddles on the harnesses are REAL knuckle busters. There is no way to avoid the use of them to slide the heddles. I do not recommend removing the unused harnesses. If the harnesses are not on the loom, the lamms and side wires are loose and potentially in harm's way. I recommend taking the unused heddles to the side and tying them in a bundle. If you need the full width and they are in the way, you must remove them. This is part of setting up a healthy warp.

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  15. I was happy to find this site. I own 2 Macombers (over 30 yrs), 48" 12H and 24" baby mac 8H. I am having an issue with both of them that I have been unable to totally fix, so I hope you have some suggestions. The 48" 12H works great, except for #12 Harness. It stay a bit elevated and is about 3/8-1/2" off the race on certain sheds. It isn't sticking, it just stay up. Of course, the shuttle catches or goes under threads when it shouldn't. Almost seems like it needs added weight.
    The other issue is the brake cable on the baby mac. When it is adjusted so it doesn't slip I can't turn the beam. When I loosen it so I can turn the beam it slips with each beat. I've cleaned it and re-wrapped - no luck.
    Thanks for any suggestions, Mary Jane

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  16. Hi,
    I am seriously thinking about an air assist for my 16 harness Macomber. My husband wants to know how big a compressor is needed for it to work adequately. Thanks, Fran

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  17. Hi Fran:
    Any small air compressor will work fine. All you need is 40 lbs of pressure to run the loom. Hope this helps. You can see my compressor in an older blog posting...don't have the link handy sorry. But the one that is about the air dobby system. Cheers, Sarah

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